I love raptors!  I think by watching other nests we can compare and contrast what we see in order to gain a better overall understanding of raptors. There are many nest cams out there, I can’t watch them all, but I welcome highlights from other cams!

_____________________________________________________________________

4/30/16 – Welcome C3…I really want to add PO! ok, its said, enough of those jokes! It appears that Hope is brooding and the next chick is fine, see a quick peek here.

_____________________________________________________________________

4/29/16 – Welcome C1! The Cathedral of Learning peregrine falcon chicks are beginning to hatch. The first one hatched early this morning and the second chick is beginning to hatch now. If you remember, because of the delayed incubation, the peregrine falcon chicks will all hatch within about a day. This year marks the first year that the falcon chicks will be named. Images courtesy of The National Aviary and Wild Earth.

Second egg hatching at Cathedral of Learning 4_29_16
Second egg hatching at Cathedral of Learning 4/29/16
Welcome C1 on 4/29/16
Welcome C1 on 4/29/16

Just as soon as I got the news about the second hatch in progress at the Cathedral of Learning the chick is out of the egg. However, before long the chick was sacrificed as food for Hope and C1. There had not yet been a food delivery to the scrape and this may be due to the relative inexperience of this peregrine falcon pair. Even though it may be difficult to accept, this is the way of wild animals, and we are privileged to have the opportunity to watch without interfering.

First feeding attempt at CoL 4/29/16
First feeding attempt at CoL 4/29/16

Evening update: While the events that occurred today are understandably upsetting to many viewers, I want to assure you that the behavior we witnessed today is not unheard of in raptors or other birds and likely carries with it a selective advantage. Much has been written about why siblicide and infanticide occurs in animals (review article). In this case, it may be that C1 has a greater chance of survival because there is less competition for resources.

Additional References:

Boal, C.W. and J.E. Bacorn. 1994. Siblicide and Cannibalism at Northern Goshawk Nests. The Auk. 111(3):748–750.

Hrdy, S.B. 1979. Infanticide among animals: A review, classification, and examination of the implications for the reproductive strategies of females. Ethology and Sociobiology. 1(1):13–40.

Korňan, M. and M. Macek. 2011. Parental Infanticide Followed by Cannibalism in Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). Journal of Raptor Research. 45(1):95–96.

Markham, A.C. and B.D. Watts. 2007. Documentation of Infanticide and Cannibalism in Bald Eagles. Journal of Raptor Research. 41(1):41–44.

Moreno, J. 2012. Parental infanticide in birds through early eviction from the nest: rare or under-reported? Journal of Avian Biology. 43: 43–49.

O’Connor, R.J. 1978. Brood reduction in birds: Selection for fratricide, infanticide and suicide? Animal Behaviour. 26 (1):79–96.

_____________________________________________________________________

4/24/16 – I made another trip to the trail at the Hays nest today and snapped these pictures of mom flying with a stick so small, it has to be called a twig! I wonder what purpose this tiny stick has in the huge nest?

Hays female twig carry 4/24/16
Hays female twig carry 4/24/16
Hays female brings twig to nest 4/24/16
Hays female brings twig to nest 4/24/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/23/16 – Wow, there was another intruder at the Cathedral of Learning scrape…this time it was an adult female with a purple band on her right leg and black over red bands on her left leg. My screen shots were not good enough to read the band markings, but hopefully the still cam was able to capture enough information. I am not sure why Hope would have let another adult female in to the scrape while her eggs were there, I would have thought she would fight off another adult female. Watch the video here. Images courtesy of The National Aviary and Wild Earth.

Intruder at CoL scrape 4/23/16
Intruder at CoL scrape 4/23/16
Terzo rushes out of scrape away from intruder 4/23/16
Terzo rushes out of scrape away from intruder 4/23/16
Intruder's leg bands 4/23/16
Intruder’s leg bands 4/23/16

Wonder where the Hays eagles are when you can’t see them on the nest cam? I was able to visit the Three Rivers Heritage Trail and snap these pictures yesterday afternoon.

Hays female keep an eye on nest from hangout tree 4/22/16
Hays female keep an eye on nest from hangout tree 4/22/16
Hays dad flies as mom perches 4/22/16
Hays dad flies as mom perches 4/22/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/20/16 – I heard through the chat grapevines that the Chesapeake Conservancy osprey, Audrey, laid her second egg today! Congratulations!

Then I heard that part of the SWFL nest is collapsing! SWFL has seen so much drama over the past two seasons, now M15 and Harriet will likely need to rebuild, because if looks like this nest has a precarious future, although, you can see from this screen shot, the eaglet E8 is in no danger of the nest failing before fledging. Thanks you Dick Pritchett Real Estate for bringing us these images.

SWFL's E8 on nest 4/20/16
SWFL’s E8 on nest 4/20/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/18/16 – While we were celebrating the confirmation of a second hatch at the Harmar eagle nest the Chesapeake Conservancy osprey female laid her first egg of the season! Thank you Chesapeake Conservancy for these images!

Audrey and Tom osprey with their first egg of 2016 on 4/18
Audrey and Tom osprey with their first egg of 2016 on 4/18
Audrey and Tom osprey and the first egg on 4/18/16
Audrey and Tom osprey and the first egg on 4/18/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/12/16 – Can’t resist those owlets! Here the Savannah Great Horned Owlets get in some wingercising, and go airborne! Better watch now, time is running low to see them on the nest! Image courtesy of The Landings and HD on Tap.

Savannah Great Horned Owlet airborne! 4/12/16
Savannah Great Horned Owlet airborne! 4/12/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/11/16 – The Great Horned Owlets in Savannah are getting close to fledging, and are so very fuzzy still. It is normal for the owlets to lean on each other for support as they are growing, and it really comes in handy on windy days! Image courtesy of The Landings and HD on Tap.

Savannah Great Horned Owlets lean on each other while napping 4/9/16
Savannah Great Horned Owlets lean on each other while napping 4/9/16
Savannah Great Horned Owlets lean into each other to brace against the wind 4/10/16
Savannah Great Horned Owlets lean into each other to brace against the wind 4/10/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/7/16 – The Cathedral of Learning continues to be a great source of fun as we watch a new peregrine falcon pair begin their first breeding cycle. While I was out of town Hope did something really funny that I thank the chatters for pointing out! Watch the videomark and I will add some funny screen shots soon!

Today, there was an interesting event when a female juvenile peregrine falcon entered the scrape and appeared to be courting Terzo! She bowed and e-chupped at him and he sat up quickly, then took the opportunity to scoot out of the scrape. Watch the videomark and see Kate St. John’s comments. Thank you National Aviary and Wild Earth for the images.

Terzo looks at female juvenile falcon as she enters the scrape 4/8/16
Terzo looks at female juvenile falcon as she enters the scrape 4/8/16
Terzo is off the eggs and facing juvenile falcon 4/8/16
Terzo is off the eggs and facing juvenile falcon 4/8/16
Hey Terzo, where did you go? 4/8/16
Hey Terzo, where did you go? 4/8/16
Female juvenile peregrine falcon visiting Cathedral scrape 4/8/16
Female juvenile peregrine falcon visiting Cathedral scrape 4/8/16

_____________________________________________________________________

4/2/16 – Great news broke late in the afternoon when Hope, the peregrine falcon at the Cathedral of Learning, laid a fourth egg of the season, her first with her new mate, Terzo! Because peregrine falcons use ‘delayed incubation’, it is still possible that her eggs from her former mate, E2, may hatch with her new eggs with Terzo. Watch the nest cam and see what happens!  And remember, we are still hoping for a new, moderated chat to come soon to the falcon cam! Images courtesy of The National Aviary and Wild Earth.

Hope lays first egg with Terzo 4/2/16 16:34:00
Hope lays first egg with Terzo 4/2/16 16:34:00
Hope give us a look at her fourth egg, first with Terzo 4/2/16
Hope give us a look at her fourth egg, first with Terzo 4/2/16
Hope quickly gathers the new egg 4/2/16
Hope quickly gathers the new egg 4/2/16
Hope brings the new egg over to the others 4/2/16
Hope brings the new egg over to the others 4/2/16

Thank you to our chatter who created the video of Hope laying her egg and posted it on you tube, everyone can watch here!

_____________________________________________________________________

4/1/16 – Well, it seems that ‘Calico Tom’ osprey has now returned to the Chesapeake Conservancy platform! See if you can spot the differences between Tom and the stranger osprey, pictured below with Audrey on 3/24 and 3/27. Thank you Chesapeake Conservancy for bringing us these images!

Calico Tom and Audrey osprey engaged 4/1/16
Calico Tom and Audrey osprey engaged 4/1/16
Audrey and Calico Tom osprey 4/1/16
Audrey and Calico Tom osprey 4/1/16
Advertisements