I love raptors!  I think by watching other nests we can compare and contrast what we see in order to gain a better overall understanding of raptors. There are many nest cams out there, I can’t watch them all, but I welcome highlights from other cams!

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3/31/16 – Terzo was able to lure Hope into the scrape and perform a tentative courtship dance for about 20 seconds, while they did not bob up and down, they did bow to each other! The courtship seems to be progressing! Thanks again to the National Aviary and Wild Earth for the images, and to the chatter who submitted the screenshot!

Terzo and Hope in the scrape courting 3/31/16
Terzo and Hope in the scrape courting 3/31/16

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3/30/16 – This evening brought some sad news from the Hanover nest as they lost an eaglet today, with one egg yet to pip. The PA Game Commission explains their non-intervention policy and that it would be a violation of the law to approach the nest to attempt to intervene.

On a brighter note, Terzo and Hope advanced their courtship today when Terzo brought food into the scrape for Hope, then tried to incubate her eggs. Thank you National Aviary and Wild Earth for the images, and to the chatters who submitted screenshots!

Hope accepts food gift from Terzo in scrape 3/30/16
Hope accepts food gift from Terzo in scrape 3/30/16
Terzo attempts to cover three eggs 3/30/16
Terzo attempts to cover three eggs 3/30/16

3/30/16 – Welcome Terzo!  Kate St. John has named the new male peregrine falcon at the Cathedral of Learning! Hopefully Terzo and Hope will bring us many years of nest cam watching and enjoyment! Best of luck to the new pair!

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3/28/16 – This pair of Great Horned owlets is so cute I just don’t know what else to say! Do you have something to say about it? Post a comment at the bottom of the page and tell me what you think! Image courtesy of The Landings and HD on Tap.

Great Horned owlets 3/27/16
Great Horned owlets 3/27/16

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3/27/16 – Pip watch is still underway at the Hanover nest, but late in the day the third Hays egg seems to have pipped, although ASWP said the film was inconclusive, so we will see when the next eaglets arrive.

Tom/Stranger* and Audrey Osprey finally gave me an opportunity to examine some photos and determine how to identify which one is which, thank you Chesapeake Conservancy for bringing us the cam and these images. Look through the labeled photos on the Osprey Camera Blog and tell me who you think they are.

*3/29/16 – Note: I just saw the post from the Crazy Osprey lady stating this is not Tom, but a stranger osprey. My apologies! Well, at least I can tell the two apart, whomever this new one is!

Audrey and Tom at Chesapeake Conservancy Platform 3_27_16

Audrey and Tom at the Chesapeake Conservancy platform later 3_27_16

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3/25/16 – The excitement continues at the Cathedral of Learning falcon scrape! The new male visited the scrape this morning and we were able to capture some screen shots! Hopefully the Game Commission was able to read the bands and we learn this falcon’s identity soon! We know this is a new falcon because Hope sports a green band on her right leg and this bird has a silver band on the right leg. Images courtesy of The National Aviary and Wild Earth.

Hope's yet to be identified new mate 3/25/16
Hope’s yet to be identified new mate 3/25/16
Hope's new mate in CoL scrape 3/25/16
Hope’s new mate in CoL scrape 3/25/16

You can see a video of this visit here.

PS- Art McMorris of the PA Game Commission has the information from this male’s bands and is in the process of determining his origins. We know he sports a silver U.S. Fish and Wildlife band on his right leg, and a black N and red 29 on his left leg. Given the holiday, is might be several days before there is more information, but be sure to check the comments in KSJ’s thread about this pair’s courtship, or her home page for the most recent information.

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3/24/16 – Hope and the new male continue to court and KSJ reported that the pair were seen mating today.

It is so good to see Tom* (see note above dated 3/29) osprey at the Chesapeake Conservancy cam, thank you for the images! I’m not sure just when he returned, but if you know, drop me a line at harmareagle@gmail.com.

Both osprey at Chesapeake 3/24/16
Both osprey at Chesapeake 3/24/16

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3/23/16 – Good News! Hope, the peregrine falcon at the Cathedral of Learning, was heard calling off the nest cam at 7:46pm, she entered the scrape and was heard calling. She seemed to be watching something overhead as she looked skyward (a male making aerial displays?). At 7:53 a second falcon was heard calling off cam and Hope immediately began bowing and chirping vigorously! Hopefully soon we will see the second falcon on cam and we can learn its identity. We can’t be certain what will happen next, but you can watch the cam stream through the National Aviary here. Be sure to stay current on the Pittsburgh falcons by visiting Kate St. John’s Outside My Window page. Images courtesy of The National Aviary and Wild Earth.

Hope watches off cam 19:53 3/23/16
Hope watches off cam 19:53 3/23/16
Hope perks at calling from off cam 19:53 3/23/16
Hope perks at calling from off cam 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows rapidly in response to call from off cam 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows rapidly in response to call from off cam 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows vigorously 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows vigorously 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows to off cam falcon 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows to off cam falcon 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows and struts across the scrape 19:53 3/23/16
Hope bows and struts across the scrape 19:53 3/23/16
Hope still displaying 19:53 3/23/16
Hope still displaying 19:53 3/23/16

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3/22/16 – Welcome H6! Congratulations to our next-nest neighbors, the Hays eagles, on the arrival of the second eaglet of the season! Pix posted a video here.

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3/22/16 – Kate St. John has noted that the peregrine falcons Louie and Dori do not appear to have laid eggs at the Gulf Tower and may be using another scrape. If you see peregrine falcons in downtown Pittsburgh, please report the location to KSJ on her blog.

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3/22/16 – Can you tell what this prey item is at the Great Horned Owl nest in Savannah, GA? As one chatter pointed out, it looks a lot like the Wicked Witch of the West after Dorothy dropped a house on her (just missing the striped socks!). Image courtesy of The Landings and HD on Tap.

Great Horned Owl Family with Great Egret prey item 3/22/16
Great Horned Owl Family with Great Egret prey item 3/22/16

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3/22/16 – More news from our next-nest neighbors, the Hays Eagles…they have a second pip! Thank you to chatter Sheba for sending this adorable screen shot of H5 being fed, with pip visible in second egg, …and is that debris on the third egg? Images courtesy of PixController, ASWP and Wild Earth.

H5 is fed while the second egg is showing a pip 3/22/16

Later in the day the Hays parents were both off the nest for a brief period of time. The little eaglet was fine, the parent’s keep an eye on the nest even if we can’t see them on cam.

H5 gets a look at the world with no parents on the nest 3/22/16
H5 gets a look at the world with no parents on the nest 3/22/16

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3/21/16 – Welcome H5! Congratulations to out next-nest neighbors, the Hays eagles, who welcomed the arrival of their first hatch of the season in the early morning hours! Watch the videos here:

H5 cracks shell and H5 has hatched!

Image courtesy of PixController, ASWP and Wild Earth.

H5 taking an afternoon feeding 3/21/16
H5 taking an afternoon feeding 3/21/16

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3/20/16 – Pip! Pip! Hooray! Our next-nest neighbors, the Hays eagles are celebrating their first pip of the season! Congratulations Hays, and here’s hoping for another great ‘year-of-three’! Images courtesy of PixController, ASWP and Wild Earth.

Hays male gives us a look at the first pip 3_20_16_ 9_53 am
Hays male gives us a look at the first pip 3/20/16 at 9:53 am
Hays male rolls egg with view of pip 3_20_16_9_53 am
Hays male rolls egg with view of pip 3/20/16 at 9:53 am
Hays male give another look at pip 3_20_16_6_46 pm
Hays male give another look at pip 3/20/16 at 6:46 pm

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3/19/16 – I love the way the Hanover female protects her eggs and keeps them dry!

Hanover female demonstrates ‘spread-eagle’ pose to keep eggs dry 3/19/16. Image courtesy of Pennsylvania Game Commission, HDOnTap and Comcast Business

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3/18/16 – ABC News covered the hatch at the new DC eagle cam and made note of our next-nest neighbor cam, the Hays Eagles! Watch here.

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3/18/16 – Kate St. John is the primary source of reliable and current information on the evolving situation with the peregrine falcons at the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh. Please visit her blog, Outside My Window,  frequently and be sure to read through the comments for her replies to remain up to date on the situation.

The National Aviary is streaming the Pitt Peregrine Falcon Nest Cam here.

There will be a moderated chat feature coming online soon, and I will let you know if I hear of a date to expect to see the chat.

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3/17/16 – Sad news to report from the Cathedral of Learning Falcons…we are saddened by the passing of E2, the male peregrine falcon that lived at the Cathedral with first Dorothy, then Hope. It is unfortunate to lose E2 so soon after losing Dorothy. Hope will most likely be unable to care for the eggs that would have been his progeny unless she finds a new mate soon (there is a slight chance if she lays a new clutch soon that all the eggs will hatch). The best we can hope for is Hope finding a new mate soon and starting a new clutch of eggs. See story here.

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3/16/16 – Who’s that osprey?

Generally speaking, the male osprey return first from their migration…but who is this at the Chesapeake Conservancy nest platform?

Osprey 3_15_16
Osprey at platform 3/15/16

This osprey looks very similar to last season’s female, dubbed Audrey. This family photo shows Audrey with her foster family.

Osprey Family 7_19_15
Osprey family 7/19/15

Even the Crazy Osprey Family is not absolutely sure of the identity of this bird, but it seems that Audrey returned before Tom this year. Hope to see you soon Tom! See the story about the return of the osprey and the installation of the cam for this season here.

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3/15/16 – The Hays eagles had some excitement yesterday when a new eagle stopped by the nest while the female was incubating three eggs on 3/14/16.

Thank you Pix for posting the video!

Here is a series of screen shots captured of the event, images courtesy of PixController, ASWP and Wild Earth:

Hays intruder 1
Hays intruder 1
Hays intruder 2
Hays intruder 2
Hays intruder 3
Hays intruder 3
Hays intruder 4
Hays intruder 4
Hays intruder 5
Hays intruder 5
Hays intruder 6
Hays intruder 6
Hays intruder 7
Hays intruder 7
Hays intruder 8
Hays intruder 8
Hays intruder 9
Hays intruder 9
Hays intruder 10
Hays intruder 10
Hays intruder 11
Hays intruder 11

As the bald eagle population continues to grow we can expect more of these events. Often the encounter takes place off the nest and we never see it.